Whitefield Academy Blog

Whitefield Goes to Guatemala: Repairing the Ruins

Whitefield Goes to Guatemala: Repairing the Ruins

On March 14, 2019, five Spanish 3 Whitefield Academy seniors and I got on a plane and flew to Guatemala. We went to work alongside the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ Guatemalan staff to share how the Lord has changed our lives (in Spanish!) through soccer camps for kids and through sharing the Gospel with our testimonies. As God usually sees fit, He used this trip to reveal more of Himself to us as well.

Making Technology Work for Our Family

Making Technology Work for Our Family

“Bullet, Bullet, Bullet!” is the hopeful chant ringing from my basement. No need for alarm, my kids are just in 11th place on Mario Kart Wii and hoping desperately to get the “bullet” that will rocket them to the front of the race. After an overdue basement clean-out, we unearthed a dusty Wii system that, after ten years of inactivity, surprisingly still worked! Newly introduced to the excitement of racing Luigi and Baby Peach through digital lands like Moo Moo Meadows and the ever formidable Rainbow Road, our kids quickly found their “need for speed.”

Classical Kindergarten: What’s the Difference?

Classical Kindergarten: What’s the Difference?

I’ve had a few experiences in my parenting life where I have officially felt like a parent.  The first one was driving to VBS in my SUV while wearing a neon VBS t-shirt and playing bible songs for my kids in carseats behind me.  The second one was sitting outside my oldest daughter’s Winnie the Pooh theatre class, waiting with all the other parents.  The third was dropping my daughter off for full day kindergarten.

Saving Our Children from Narcissism

As a father of young children with an interest in history, I have often wondered how Christians in the past raised their children and what great church leaders taught about parenting. One Christian teacher who wrote extensively on the subject was Saint John Chrysostom, an Archbishop of Constantinople in the fourth century. “Chrysostom” was a nickname meaning “golden-mouthed,” a reference to the bishop’s skill in the art of rhetoric. He was a favorite of the Protestant Reformer John Calvin, who admired his faithful interpretation of Scripture in his many sermons.

The Busy Mom’s Guide to Prayer

The Busy Mom’s Guide to Prayer

I’ve always struggled with having a consistent prayer life. I found myself offering up the standard, “I’ll be praying for you,” to friends and then realizing, “No…I actually probably won’t. I’ll forget about this until the next time I see you.”

Latin and Greek: Why Study Them?

Latin and Greek: Why Study Them?

Why do we study Latin and Ancient Greek?  As a classicist, I have been asked this question countless times, and I can rattle off the standard answers – studying Latin and Greek beefs up students’ English vocabulary and grammar, allows them to read some of the greatest literary works of Western civilization in their original languages, and immerses them in the cultures that brought us democracy, Plato, gladiators, and the arch.  Now, these are all great reasons to study languages that otherwise seem arcane, complicated, and, well, “dead,” but the value in devoting oneself to Latin and Greek – even at the secondary school level – extends far beyond such bullet points.

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